Assignment 4

For this assignment I will be combining aspects from all 3 exercises that I have completed, taking ideas and materials that I have enjoyed working with and combining that with a labour intensive drawing by recording conversations around me inspired by ideas and work from artists Karl Hyde and Robert Smithson and the investigation into asemic writing. 

Asemic writing

Instagram hashtag that I follow. I decided to look at it in more detail and grasp an understanding. It could perhaps relate to what I am experimenting with at the moment. 

What materials can use to explore language and writing…

  • glue gun on water
  • Sewing
  • Sticking thread on paper
  • Charcoal 
  • Chalk on a chalkboard
  • Calligraphy 
  • String simply on the floor
  • Graffiti (spray paint) on the floor
  • Arabic/ Chinese/ Japanese writing (http://www.chinasage.info/langtraditional.htm – chinese symbols)
  • Chocolate sauce
  • Dip string into paint
  • Dip string into oil
  • Squirt bottle
  • Drawing with roots/ petals 
  • Ink pen in mouth
  • Water and then ink to colour it
  • Food – pasta printing 

Perhaps I should make my own symbols from drawings and text like in my poem drawing. Dont worry about how it looks, just let it come out. 

Use asemic writing to explore places, create symbols. 

Seeing asemic writing as a meditation, mindfulness process 

‘asemic writing is a shadow, impression, and abstraction of conventional writing. It uses the constraints of writerly gestures and the full developments of abstract art to divulge its main purpose: total freedom beyond literary expression.’

‘It often appears as abstract calligraphy, or as a drawing which resembles writing but avoids words, or if it does have words, the words are generally damaged beyond the point of legibility.’

Jacobsdon, M. (2019) Asymptote Journal. At: https://www.asymptotejournal.com/visual/michael-jacobson-on-asemic-writing/ (Accessed on 1 February 2019)

A way of recording and seeing things around you. My Experience with asemic writing (2016) [user-generated content online] Creat. Federici, F. 14 February 16 At: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=hovsoNNiSbY (Accessed on 1 February 2019)

Retell a story, say the writing out loud that I have recorded and then draw as doing so. 

Strips of language 

Abstracting language. Conversations recorded in writing and reworking the writing to create abstracted language. 

Once again i’m getting bogged down with ideas so if I just get started and see where it takes me. I think my most successful outcomes from my mini experiments – in relation to asemic writing is the thread on its own. Writing with string. The materials make the writing illegible. 

Completed a little experiment with costa conversation….

Robert Smithson. (2001) Drawings. At: https://www.robertsmithson.com/drawings/heap_p104_300.htm (Accessed on 1 February 2019)

I decided to look into Robert Smithson a little more in regards to his work and why he chose to compose his drawing ‘a head of language’ into a trainee shape. I was trying to think how I could represent my language in a different way. I found Smithson in my ‘contemporary drawing’ book so I decided to see if I could gather any more knowledge of his work online. I happily learnt that Smithson was a land artist. His works involve land art, sculpture and drawing, which is something (from a personal point of view) that I am really interested in and keen to develop in my work,  

He utilized non-traditional art materials such as language, mirrors, maps, dump trucks, abandoned quarries, hotels, contractors, and earth to produce his radical sculptures, photographs, films, and earthworks.

So maybe the triangle, the name of the work ‘a heap of language’ related to his involvement in land art and earth works. Like a heap of mud/ mountain/ pyramid

Embodied in all of Smithson’s endeavors was his interest in entropy, mapping, paradox, language, landscape, popular culture, anthropology, and natural history.

Mirrors were major elements in Smithson’s early structures and continued to play a major role in his later Nonsites and Displacements, begun in 1968. He said, “mirror in a sense is both the physical mirror and the reflection.” It is “a concept and abstraction”… a displacement “of properties.”

Moma (2017) Robert Smithson. At: https://www.moma.org/collection/works/149054 (Accessed on 1 February 2019) – more info on ‘a heap of language’

A Heap of Language is both an artwork and a mission statement, marrying the artist’s preoccupations with the physical presence of sculpture and the meaning behind language. Written in the artist’s elegant cursive on graph paper, words about words “speech,” “mother tongue,” “Babel” accumulate into a hefty pile, so that thought becomes thing. This drawing attests to Smithson’’s belief that language is a concrete material.

I like the idea of ‘thought becomes thing’. Language becomes an art form. 

Combining the work and findings of Karl Hyde, I chose to combine language and writing with things I heard around town, in my day to day life. On the tube, at the coffee shop etc. I documented conversations and then decided to explore with different materials to record the language in an abstract way, an illegible way, exploring the written language into an art form. 

Could I try to do the thread writing on top of a photograph?

layer the thread writing with line drawing?

Chose the ones from the original list that I think would fit in the best:

Charcoal lines. Some smudged?
Fine liner lines Done
On top of newspaper Done 
On top of photograph Done 
Oil pastel smudged 
Oil on water
Glue gun on water
Dip string in ink Done
Chocolate 
Spray paint 
Water and ink  Done, doesn’t work 

When I was re-wrtiting the words with thread or another medium I found myself visualising the people sitting in costa saying the words. I could hear their voices and remember exactly where they were sitting. I started to think about the power of words and how much information that words hold. However I just didn’t know how to demonstrate this in my work. I was considering layering the thread, creating a sense of chaos in the piece. I think its definitely too bare, not much excitement in the piece with one layer of thread onto the white surface. Perhaps I need to start thinking about the surface for my work?!

  • Writings responding to a place – write poem responding to the place you are in in regards to the senses. (assignment 5 possibility) 

IMG_4848

Sunday:

Back in the studio to really get my head into this assignment piece. 

I really like the red ink. I cant come away from it. It makes me think of my mother and I just feel a really strong connection to family. I love using the fluidity of the media and the possibilities it is giving me. I have also experimented with glue gun on water to create my lettering and this has also sparked some more inspiration for me. I like the transparency quality of the medium but also how it links to the idea of veins or bodily fluid. I understand this is coming away from my original artists that I was looking at for language but I feel this strong urge to keep going. Just playing around with the medium has really intrigued me to keep going. To take it beyond what it is capable of. 

I’m wondering, with my fascination for nature, specifically tress, I could somehow use both family and trees for assignment 5. However i’m not sure how to continue or produce some work for assignment 4. 

 

Perhaps I could use the glue gun technique and produce the words, abstracted every time from writing in the water, and then stitch them together and suspend them? From the conversations I have heard in London. 

I finally decided that this material – the glue gun – worked really well to abstract the lettering, imitating asemic writing and take on more of an art form coming away from the abruptness of language. 

 

I used all my writing that I had recorded in costa and re-wrote it with the glue gun on water. Enjoying experimenting with the fluidity of the ink and water, I enjoyed pushing materials further and experimenting with the glue, again having a fluid quality to it. 

IMG_4849

With the container that I had the water in I could only write so much with the glue gun so I completed a line or two at a time. I then stuck all these parts together in a random manner. Not in any particular way or system, but as I feel they fit together. 

 

Now that this glue gun piece is completed I would like to suspend it, shine a spotlight onto it and then draw from the shadow that it creates. Unfortunately I do not have time to complete this before the deadline however I would like to be able to complete it to send off for the formal submission. 

When glueing the individual pieces together I had to put newspaper down so the glue wouldn’t stick to the carpet. This has meant that the glue has a type of imprint from the newspaper that is embedded into the piece. Visually, the piece reminds me of a map and the newspaper points are like points of interest. I like the idea of the language from the newspaper embedded and part of the language that I have recorded first hand. 

I feel like this glue gun piece and the drawing of it would go hand in hand and would become 1 piece. You would almost view the pieces side by side. 

 

experimenting with shadow as this was my plan to do for the large final piece.

 

I then started to draw on the wall to show what my plan was to create the piece on paper from the glue gun piece suspended.

 

Perhaps my subconscious is related to my previous assignments but I really feel that this final image relates to a map. I am keen to progress these ideas further.

Demonstration of technical and visual skills:

At the beginning of part 4 I don’t think I was clearly demonstrating evidence of technical and visual skills. I feel that throughout this part – process – it really has been about the development of working with different materials and experimenting with materials in different ways. I surprisingly really enjoyed exercise 4.2, the labour intensive piece. I feel it was the first time ever I had put time and effort into a drawing, almost (at times) forcing myself to complete the piece, and i’m glad I did. I am not good at committing myself to a drawing that takes a lot of time and patience. I like to  do quick experiments. The exercise made me focus on the drawing bit by bit and allowing myself to go into a meditation type process. This labour intensive process stuck with me and I feel that I also produced a labour intensive piece for the assignment. However I don’t think my initial drawing for exercise 4.2 satisfied a clear demonstration of those technical and visual skills that I am keen to show. Firstly, I felt the drawing was almost completed too quickly, time and labour were not clearly demonstrated and secondly, I felt that the marks I created weren’t particularly skilful, I felt that time hadn’t been spent on honing in on those technical skills (those fine marks that the other piece does have) to demonstrate an intentional thought out process, to produce an aesthetically pleasing outcome. I do feel that my second drawing does do this. I wanted to demonstrate and further push my technical and visual skills and I had hoped to complete a drawing from the glue gun suspended piece, although I did not have time to do this. However I would like to be able to create this to send off for formal submission, so I’m hopeful it is something I can do whilst completing assignment 5. I feel this part of the course was more about extending your understanding of what drawing is and can be and because of this, I think I perhaps fall short on clear technical skill in my drawing. 

Quality of outcome:

I think the quality of outcome in my work is one of my downfalls. I struggle with deciding whether the exercises should be pieces in their own right or simply experiments. I think sometimes they can be both, for example I feel that exercise 4.2 can be considered as a final piece. However I think for exercise 4.1 the work was to be creative and experimental and I wasn’t worried about producing a quality piece. The assignment piece can be viewed as a little ‘haphazard’. When gluing the pieces of writing together (to have the piece as one whole) I felt a little ‘clumsy’ with the glue gun and you can see some heavier parts of glue in where I have attached them together. It also doesn’t help that where I had to put newspaper down (so it didn’t stick to the carpet) it has parts of text embedded into the glue. I actually really like that effect, particularly as it adds a further dimension to the idea of language that surrounds us, but for this piece I wanted the piece to be clear, like a ghostly presence, something that could go un-noticed as I think our language does. 

Demonstration of creativity:

I really enjoyed the labour intensive process as I mentioned above and this meant that when I was drawing I was almost becoming part of the piece. I felt lost when drawing those marks in exercise 4.2. Each individual mark was so small in comparison to the piece as a whole but each mark was important as it would determine the direction the line would take. Along with ideas from exercise 4.2, completing exercise 4.3 also was an important process that I took this forward for the completion of the assignment piece. I found speaking out loud and drawing a real challenge but I enjoyed the freedom to add words into the drawing. Words that stood out to me. I adopted this idea of language and along with ideas from the work of artists, Karl Hyde and Robert Smithson, I had a starting point for my assignment piece. For the assignment piece, I wanted to produce a piece that was labour intensive but also out of the ordinary. I wanted to push the boundaries of what drawing is, one of the reasons I liked the idea of producing writing, and I didn’t want to simply use a pen and paper. I feel that the piece also takes on this idea of making the drawing into a 3D piece (ideas from assignment 3) and away from the flat traditional ideas of drawing. The 3D ideas, also fed into my work for exercise 4.2, which I thoroughly enjoyed creating, I was really pleased with the outcome of the lines and the way the work visually related to the coast, due to its rhythm and movement. The glue gun glue, as I mentioned in my reflection of it, reminds me a little of veins and bodily fluid, which is starting to spark a link in my work from my interest in fluid media, right from the beginning of the course.

Context: 

I still need to work on my reflection process. I think my research works well in offering a point of inspiration for my ideas and subject matter. I wanted language to be a big part of this piece and touching (I think I could take the idea further) on what language means to us. How we use it to communicate. How we use it in different areas of our lives, in business, meeting friends, with family etc. I feel that I have researched a lot more artists to support the exercises I have completed and reflected on their work to inform mine, however I feel that I need to deepen that reflection process once I have completed the piece, referring back to the artists work. I would like to further combine works that involve a labour intensive task and develop my interest of language. I think this could maybe move forward into assignment 5. 

Assignment 4, response to feedback:

Overall I was quite pleased with my feedback for assignment 4. I was pleased to read in my feedback that my tutor noticed my engagement and enjoyment within part 4. The same points to work keep coming up – composition and developing my reflection and analysis techniques – but the feedback highlights that my critical reflection is improving and i’m glad to hear this as this is something that I have been working on. 

I have highlighted some of the comments from the report and responded to it. I then have also completed the pointers and suggested viewing that I was recommended to look into. 

Consider composition a little bit more… being slightly more away of the space and shapes within the drawings, as well as the drawings as objects. – this is a point that keeps coming to the surface in my feedback. Assignment 2 I feel was successful in regards to its composition but it is something that I need to start considering and paying attention to in more detail. 

I also like the photos of it lying as a solid form. The drawing from the shadow sounds great, and another way of mapping space. – this could be something I could pursue. I mentioned in my reflection that I wanted to draw from its shadow that the piece created so perhaps my tutor does want to see this happen.

As an object now the thing has some weight to it, it is slabby and I quite like that? – during my response to this feedback I also remembered that I needed to finish my response to assignment 2 feedback (as I hadn’t looked at it properly at the time). However, by my tutor seeing this piece as an object, how I have been thinking of a drawing as being an object, it made me revert my mind back to assignment 2 when I started to think about stuff and things having some sort of value. It is interesting that these things have found a way into my work without me even realising until I have now reflected on that moment. 

the narratives of the original bits still seem slightly interesting – in a way that newspaper has adhered, to somehow keep an open mind about reintroducing narrative somehow. – now im not sure what I think of this or if I understand what she means but the thought of making some sort of narrative legible is an interesting thought that I hadn’t considered. 

Your reflection is honest and constructive and the connections you are making mean that you are building a convincing personal practice – I’m pleased with this comment as I find one of weaknesses is during my reflection process but I have tried to focus on it a little more by giving my work and my head space and time to breathe before moving on. 

Material is the best way to make a rubbing of a rock I think. Canvas or cotton and wax crayons? – I might try this out as nothing I was doing seemed to be working. 

This is an exemplary and stunning piece of work, very well described in your log. – whoooooo!!!! I have finally made a piece of work of which I enjoyed, am pleased with and my tutor agrees. It is really lovely to hear someone to say that about my work. 

My tutor mentions that the artists I have been using ‘transcribe information from other sources’ (which is apparently what I am doing too). ‘they are using outlines or maps and laying them over each other to find new patterns and structures’. 

Perhaps you won’t come up with a universal and complete definition of drawing but you might identify its key territories, tensions and potential. Within that you can develop a personal practice that doesn’t have to tick all the boxes, it can be what it needs to be. – now this sounds very interesting in a way that I have started to define drawing in a way that I understand it. But i’m not sure what she means by this. 

In terms of choosing to keep things secret, or deciding whether to share something personal, in art we can leave lots of things half told or hidden. – I quite like the idea of this and the possibility of ‘keeping things hidden’ or something for the audience to either work out or something within themselves that they have to work out, putting the puzzle of my work back onto them. 

Along with artists that my tutor recommended I look at, she gave me a few bullet point pointers to focus on:

  • Consider the spaces and shapes within the work
  • Think about structure and how you generate form

I emailed my tutor about what she meant by these. She mentioned that she was referring to composition as spaces and shapes. Structure and form go hand in hand with the space that the piece is installed in and the space within the piece. She mentions that drawing as a process can mean that it can be difficult to define a composition. I wonder now that ive never been able to master this idea of ‘composition’ because I enjoy working in a way that is not planned. I like to find and experiment with materials and ideas as I go as I never know what I might end up producing. I love this about art and the more I work the more links and discoveries I can make without having it planned out too much. In this email my tutor also mentioned an artists named ‘Ian Mckeever’ which I looked up. I find his work very intriguing and I am keen to discover more about him and his work. I will be taking this forward with me into assignment 5. 

Artists that were recommended I look at moving forward into assignment 5:

Mark Tobey 

1918 Tobey converted to the Baha’i World Faith which commenced his interest into calligraphic and spiritual ways of making art. He travelled extensively and spent a month in a zen monastery in 1934. A year after this he began his “white writing” paintings. 

Advance of History

– All over composition 

– Your eye travels through the piece as they follow the strokes made on the surface. 

  • Tobey wrote, “I have sought to make my painting ‘whole’ but to attain this I have used a whirling mass. I take up no definite position.”¹
  • In 1935 Tobey introduced ‘white writing’. This way of making marks was linked to his discovery of oriental traditions of ink brushwork in china and Japan where he found himself 

“freed from form by the influence of the calligraphic.”²

Guggenheim (2019) Mark Tobey. At: https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/4057 (Accessed on 5 March 2019) 

Figure 1. Tobey, M. (1964) Advance of History [Gouache and watercolor on paper] At: https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/

Assignment 4, response to feedback:

Overall I was quite pleased with my feedback for assignment 4. I was pleased to read in my feedback that my tutor noticed my engagement and enjoyment within part 4. The same points to work keep coming up – composition and developing my reflection and analysis techniques – but the feedback highlights that my critical reflection is improving and i’m glad to hear this as this is something that I have been working on. 

I have highlighted some of the comments from the report and responded to it. I then have also completed the pointers and suggested viewing that I was recommended to look into. 

Consider composition a little bit more… being slightly more away of the space and shapes within the drawings, as well as the drawings as objects. – this is a point that keeps coming to the surface in my feedback. Assignment 2 I feel was successful in regards to its composition but it is something that I need to start considering and paying attention to in more detail. 

I also like the photos of it lying as a solid form. The drawing from the shadow sounds great, and another way of mapping space. – this could be something I could pursue. I mentioned in my reflection that I wanted to draw from its shadow that the piece created so perhaps my tutor does want to see this happen.

As an object now the thing has some weight to it, it is slabby and I quite like that? – during my response to this feedback I also remembered that I needed to finish my response to assignment 2 feedback (as I hadn’t looked at it properly at the time). However, by my tutor seeing this piece as an object, how I have been thinking of a drawing as being an object, it made me revert my mind back to assignment 2 when I started to think about stuff and things having some sort of value. It is interesting that these things have found a way into my work without me even realising until I have now reflected on that moment. 

the narratives of the original bits still seem slightly interesting – in a way that newspaper has adhered, to somehow keep an open mind about reintroducing narrative somehow. – now im not sure what I think of this or if I understand what she means but the thought of making some sort of narrative legible is an interesting thought that I hadn’t considered. 

Your reflection is honest and constructive and the connections you are making mean that

you are building a convincing personal practice – I’m pleased with this comment as I find one of weaknesses is during my reflection process but I have tried to focus on it a little more by giving my work and my head space and time to breathe before moving on. 

Material is the best way to make a rubbing of a rock I think. Canvas or cotton and wax

crayons? – I might try this out as nothing I was doing seemed to be working. 

This is an exemplary and stunning piece of work, very well described in your log. – whoooooo!!!! I have finally made a piece of work of which I enjoyed, am pleased with and my tutor agrees. It is really lovely to hear someone to say that about my work. 

My tutor mentions that the artists I have been using ‘transcribe information from other sources’ (which is apparently what I am doing too). ‘they are using outlines or maps and laying them over each other to find new patterns and structures’. 

Perhaps you won’t come up with a universal and complete definition of drawing but you

might identify its key territories, tensions and potential. Within that you can develop a

personal practice that doesn’t have to tick all the boxes, it can be what it needs to be. – now this sounds very interesting in a way that I have started to define drawing in a way that I understand it. But i’m not sure what she means by this. 

In terms of choosing to keep things secret, or deciding whether to share something personal, in art we can leave lots of things half told or hidden. – I quite like the idea of this and the possibility of ‘keeping things hidden’ or something for the audience to either work out or something within themselves that they have to work out, putting the puzzle of my work back onto them. 

Along with artists that my tutor recommended I look at, she gave me a few bullet point pointers to focus on:

– Consider the spaces and shapes within the work

  • Think about structure and how you generate form

I emailed my tutor about what she meant by these. She mentioned that she was referring to composition as spaces and shapes. Structure and form go hand in hand with the space that the piece is installed in and the space within the piece. She mentions that drawing as a process can mean that it can be difficult to define a composition. I wonder now that ive never been able to master this idea of ‘composition’ because I enjoy working in a way that is not planned. I like to find and experiment with materials and ideas as I go as I never know what I might end up producing. I love this about art and the more I work the more links and discoveries I can make without having it planned out too much. In this email my tutor also mentioned an artists named ‘Ian Mckeever’ which I looked up. I find his work very intriguing and I am keen to discover more about him and his work. I will be taking this forward with me into assignment 5. 

Artists that were recommended I look at moving forward into assignment 5:

Mark Tobey 

1918 Tobey converted to the Baha’i World Faith which commenced his interest into calligraphic and spiritual ways of making art. He travelled extensively and spent a month in a zen monastery in 1934. A year after this he began his “white writing” paintings. 

Advance of History

– All over composition 

– Your eye travels through the piece as they follow the strokes made on the surface. 

  • Tobey wrote, “I have sought to make my painting ‘whole’ but to attain this I have used a whirling mass. I take up no definite position.”¹
  • In 1935 Tobey introduced ‘white writing’. This way of making marks was linked to his discovery of oriental traditions of ink brushwork in china and Japan where he found himself 

“freed from form by the influence of the calligraphic.”²

Guggenheim (2019) Mark Tobey. At: https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/4057 (Accessed on 5 March 2019) 

Figure 1. Tobey, M. (1964) Advance of History [Gouache and watercolor on paper] At: https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/4057 (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

76.2553.140_ph_web-1

Tate (s.d) Mark Tobey Northwest Drift. At: https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/tobey-northwest-drift-t00463 (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

Figure 2. Tobey, M. (1958) Northwest Drift [Tempera and gouache on paper on board] At: https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/tobey-northwest-drift-t00463 (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

Northwest Drift 1958 by Mark Tobey 1890-1976

Tobey’s white writing foregrounded the use of linear forms, spatial layers and the shifting of focus across the canvas. (tate)

The title Northwest Drift refers to the geographical location of Seattle, where the painting was made, and Tobey’s experience of the changing seasons and atmosphere of this locale. In March 1962 Tobey stated of this work:

Location geographically speaking no doubt plays a principal role in the development of this painting, for Seattle where I painted this picture is a place of virginal winds, air currents and intermingled seasons. To the West of the great Cascade Range of mountains, the atmosphere becomes softer, rain forests exist and fogs drift against the mountains and along the coast line. Gray skies, gray water make one conscious of this color and I have used a series of gray tones which seem so indigenous to the locale. I hope in the slow rhythms of this painting of the North West to have transferred some feeling of all I have spoken of above. (tate) 

(Quoted in Alley 1981, pp.724–5.)

Reflecting on his career in 1955, Tobey stated:

Over the last fifteen years, my approach to painting has varied, sometimes dependent on brush-work, sometimes on lines, dynamic white strokes in geometric space. I have never tried to pursue a particular style in my work. For me, the road has been a zig-zag into and out of old civilizations, seeking new horizons through meditation and contemplation … I take up no definite position. Maybe this explains someone’s remarks while looking at one of my paintings: ‘Where is the centre?’.

(Quoted in Whitechapel Art Gallery 1962, p.13.)

I think this quote is saying that there was never a clear path, plan, composition, that he followed when making his art.

Hamish Fulton

Tate. (s.d) Hamish Fulton: Walking Journey. At: https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/hamish-fulton-walking-journey (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

…his journeys in South Dakota and Montana in 1969, encouraged him to think that art could be ‘how you view life’, and not tied necessarily to the production of objects. He began to make short walks, and then to make photographic works about the experience of walking. (tate)

This is exactly how I am approaching my work at the moment

He has stated ‘If I do not walk, I cannot make a work of art’ and has summed up this way of thinking in the simple statement of intent: ‘no walk, no work’. – my ideas are less focused on a walk but using art to understand life and your place on the planet. (tate)

Hamish Fulton interview (2012) [user-generated content online] Creat. Ikon Gallery 30 Jul 2012  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKJ7G_btW34 (Accessed on 5 March 2019) – volunteers (however many people wanted to do it – no set number) had a couple of hundred metres to walk but it had to take them 2 hours. Idea that it was a communal walk. In contact with other people, aware of what they are doing. There’s freedom, individual choices being made on how to complete this long walk. Noticing things. 2 hours is a long time to walk a short distance. Did the artist want people to slow down?

Had to stay on the same line. In silence. United by silence. Concentration. Noticing the urban noises. Tin can rolling. Trains going past. 

My worries of dying and not being in the world could be portrayed in nature making work in nature but abandoning it? 

Emma Kay

Frieze (2001) Emma Kay. At: https://frieze.com/article/emma-kay (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

‘Emma Kay is interested in individual memory and how it processes maps, literature, religion and the past: the stuff of shared understanding.’ (frieze)

On this website it mentioned a book that Kay had written called ‘worldview’. It consists of Kay’s ‘crooked facts and massive omissions’. I have decided to buy it and have a read of the book. I have been able to borrow the book from the V&A library. 

Future of memory

Combines her own memories, with history and personal futuristic theories of the world. These ideas are shown in her work with words that are projected onto the gallery wall and arranged like the opening credits in starwars films. By releasing fragments of texts at different points she is ‘controlling the amount of text that can be seen at any one time and profoundly influencing the way the work can be viewed or read.’ (Chisenhale gallery) I found Chisenhale gallery’s write up interesting as it pointed out the link of the words moving on and disappearing just like past events of the world, showing that the world is moving on, particularly staging the words in this ‘starwars way’, in space – it supports her subject matter of earth/the world, giving it a location to be. Points that are within this work cover ideas from dinosaurs (Jurassic park) to the ‘end of the death of the sun in 38900 and human extinction’. (frieze)

Rather than describing the end of the world as we know it, Kay’s partial recall provides room for doubt.’ (frieze) I think due to her personal input of her own memories. 

Chisenhale (2001) Emma Kay. At: https://chisenhale.org.uk/exhibition/emma-kay/ (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

Figure 3. Kay, E. (2001) The Future from Memory [Installation View] At: https://chisenhale.org.uk/exhibition/emma-kay/ (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

Kay_1

My understanding of her work in regards to how this links in with my work, is that her response to the world, to history to the unpredictable future is unreliable. It is only her opinion and lots of things are perhaps hidden and not told in her narratives. I’m personally not particularly ‘moved’ by this work but I found further work by her on the tae website which I found much easier to relate my ideas to.

Worldview (art work not book)

Tate. (s.d) Emma Kay Worldview. At: https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/kay-worldview-p78340 (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

Figure 4. Kay, E. (1999) Worldview. [Digital print on paper]. At: https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/kay-worldview-p78340 (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

Worldview 1999 by Emma Kay born 1961

‘Worldview is a large text work in which Emma Kay recounts a history of the world, starting from the ‘big bang’, in which the earth was created, and ending with apocalyptic visions stimulated by the imminent millennium at the end of 1999.’ (tate)

‘When I am writing I always imagine myself in some kind of virtual computer environment and think of my memory works as hypertexts…Hypertext is an apparently objective attempt to impose order over chaos and to get to grips with vast resources, though its subjectivity is inescapable.’ (tate) – making sense of the world from a personal view. 

Kay’s work points to the subjectivity and relativity of memory.

The years that Kay remembers most, are where there is more detail than in other years. She can write extensively about her personal view on things in the world when she has a better understanding of them. ‘The 1990s are first referred to in the sixteenth column and the events of 1999 enter the text at the bottom of the twentieth column. This reflects the greater knowledge each of us has of our own time in relation to that of past eras. Just as we remember the recent events of our own lives with greater clarity than those of our early history, the events of our own time have greater significance and relevance than those of the far distant past.’ (Tate)

‘Worldview is one of several works on paper Kay has made based on her memory. In the first of these, The Bible from Memory 1997 (Tate P78331), she recounts what she remembers of the Bible. Both works may tell the viewer more about Kay and her memory (or their own memory) than it does about its purported subject.’ (Tate)

The Bible from memory 1997

Figure 5. Kay, E. (1997) The Bible from Memory [Lithograph on paper mounted onto board] https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/kay-the-bible-from-memory-p78331 (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

The Bible from Memory 1997 by Emma Kay born 1961

Sue Tompkins

I know Wikipedia isn’t the most reliable resource (and I never use it) but I started to watch one of her performances and I was struggling to understand it. I just didn’t get it. I wanted to find out a little more about her work and I was just getting loads of biographies of her exhibitions from galleries. Wikipedia said this: ‘Sue Tompkins uses the spoken and written word delivered in a deceptively simple and direct fashion. The written word comes first: she accumulates copious notes over a period of time then edits and refines them to create disjointed yet succinct texts that combine repeated words with constructed phrases to evoke imagery, emotion and ideas.’  (wikipedia) It makes sense now as her performance was very disjointed as with the amount of pauses and odd connections of her sentences, it became clear that they are from different parts of texts. 

This idea of disjointed texts links with my work of the costa conversations and the work I created for it. I guess a performance of my piece would be a similar outcome perhaps. 

Wikipedia. (2018) Sue Tompkins. At: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sue_Tompkins (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

Sue Tompkins: Performance at White Columns (2014) [television programme online] Pres. Modern Institute. Vimeo. At: https://www.thewire.co.uk/video/watch_sue-tompkins-performance (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

Antoni Tàpies

Guggenheim (2019) Antoni Tàpies. At: https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/antoni-tapies (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

Early on his work he was influenced by Max Ernst, Paul Klee, and Joan Miró, and by Eastern philosophy. He soon developed a distinct style which was related to ‘matiérisme (matter art), or Art Informel, a movement that focused on the materials of art making.’ (guggenheim) This way of working had a focus on the explorative qualities of matter and textural richness. Tàpies started using earth and stone – materials that would ‘evoke solidity and mass—in his large-scale works.’ (guggenheim)

Figure 6. Tàpies, A. (1958) Great Painting. [oil with sand on canvas] At: https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/4037 (Accessed on 5 March 2019)

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Great painting

‘Tàpies reevaluated humble materials, things of the earth such as sand—which he used in Great Painting (Gran pintura, 1958)—and straw as well as the refuse of humanity such as string and bits of fabric. By calling attention to this seemingly inconsequential matter, he suggested that beauty can be found in unlikely places.’; (guggenheim) – even what humans have disgarded? They no longer need?

‘Tàpies saw his works as objects of meditation that every viewer will interpret according to personal experience.’ (Guggenheim)

In many other paintings, similar to ‘Great Painting’ Tàpies often resembles walls that have been scuffed by human contact over time. Tàpies called walls the “witnesses of the martyrdoms and inhuman sufferings inflicted on our people.”¹ ‘Great Painting suggests the artist’s poetic memorial to those who have perished and those who have endured.’ – evidence of finding something that is beautiful in an unlikely place or even something that goes unnoticed as it is has a purpose?! It perhaps is not considered art for that matter. 

Great painting 

Ambroisia

Figure 7. Tàpies, A. (1989) Ambroisia. [mixed media on canvas] At: https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/30 (Accessed on 5 March 2019)GBM1997.11_ph_web-1

Cy Twombly – I love this artists work and looked it at it in drawing 1, but I find his work really hard to ‘get’. I have requested a book about him from the V&A library which I will be collecting this week. So I will be researching Twombly and taking it forward with me into assignment 5. 

Jonathon Owen – I will be editing this page on the research page on my. Blog titled Jonathan Owen. 

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